Majors & Minors

Contact
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Wagner Physics Center
Trinity University
One Trinity Place
San Antonio, TX 78212-7200
210-999-7421
Physics@trinity.edu

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Trinity's nationally recognized Physics and Astronomy Department offers a Bachelor of Science for those students who intend to enter graduate programs in physics or astronomy. A Bachelor of Arts is also offered and well suited for students planning to enter medical school, to become teachers, or to double major - including engineering and physics. Students can also earn a minor in physics or astronomy.

Physics and astronomy are closely related areas of study. 

• Physics majors study the science of matter, energy, and the interactions of forces which affect them.

• Astronomy study ranges from familiarization with the night sky to profound observational and theoretical understandings of the origin and development of our universe.

The department offers strong curricula that aim to broaden students' understanding of these areas of study through rigorous courses, opportunities for hands-on lab work in state-of-the-art research and teaching laboratories, and competitive local and/or national research programs. Students also have access to eight computer-controlled telescopes located at the roof-top observatory, weekly participation in seminars that engage students in conversation with professional physicists and astronomers who work locally and/or around the country, and faculty who are engaged and supportive of the students and their education.

Alumni from this program often further their study in graduate school with the intention of becoming physicists or astronomers. Additionally many of our graduates go on to teach physics. Read more about our alumni.

Above, Trinity students Rene Lopez III and Mike Bedwell fabricate gold nanostructures which can focus light into smaller volumes than what is possible with traditional optical components such as lenses. This technology is relevant to many applications, from amplifying fluorescent signals to increasing the output from solar cells.