Trinity University Junior Recognized for Leadership Role


Bookmark and Share

Mar. 21, 2013

Trinity University Junior Recognized for Leadership Role


Katie Ogawa named a Newman Civic Fellow as a 'problem solver' for the future


Trinity University student Katie Ogawa named a Newman Civic Fellow as a 'problem solver' for the future

By Susie P. Gonzalez

SAN ANTONIO - Working as a tireless advocate for the homeless is only one social justice cause that helped Trinity University junior Katie Ogawa, a biology major from Albuquerque, N.M., earn distinction as a 2013 Newman Civic Fellow.

Trinity University student Katie Ogawa named a Newman Civic Fellow as a 'problem solver' for the future

Ogawa is one of 181 students from 36 states who are being recognized as the next generation of public problem solvers and civic leaders. The Fellowships are awarded by Campus Compact, a national coalition of college and university presidents who embrace civic engagement in higher education, including programs to develop students' citizenship skills, forge community/campus partnerships, and provide resources and training for faculty seeking to integrate civic and community-based learning into the curriculum.

At Trinity, Ogawa created and led a residential living-learning community through HOPE Hall (Homelessness Outreach Pursuing Education), where she serves as a resident assistant, and developed an associated seminar course related to homelessness. She designed the program to include leadership training and with an infrastructure that will allow the program to continue after she graduates in 2014.

Additionally, Ogawa has international service learning experience in Nicaragua, Botswana, and Dominica. A stellar student in biology, she hopes to pursue a career in medicine and public health. Also on campus, she is a member and officer in the student Ambassador and Distinguished Representative programs and is a member of the Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity.  

The Fellows were nominated by their college and university presidents as students who are making the most of their college experiences to better understand themselves, the root causes of social issues, and effective mechanisms for creating lasting change.

"These students represent the next generation of public problem solvers and civic leaders. They serve as national examples of the role that higher education can-and does-play in building stronger communities," notes Campus Compact President Maureen Curley. 

Newman Civic Fellow Awards are made in memory of Dr. Frank Newman, a founder of Campus Compact, who dedicated his life to creating systemic change through education reform and who believed in the power of individuals to make a difference and in the power of connection with others.

The Newman Civic Fellows Awards are made possible through the generous support of the KPMG Foundation. Click here for a full list of the 2013 Newman Civic Fellows.

Susie P. Gonzalez is assistant director of University Communications and can be reached at susie.gonzalez@trinity.edu.